Hand, foot and mouth disease

Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common childhood illness that can also affect adults. It usually gets better on its own in 7 to 10 days.

Check if it's hand, foot and mouth disease

The first signs of hand, foot and mouth disease can be:

After a few days mouth ulcers and a rash will appear.

Small, round, pink blisters on a child’s hand and wrist, from hand, foot and mouth disease. Shown on white skin.
Raised spots usually appear on the hands and feet, and sometimes on the thighs and bottom as well. The spots can look pink, red, or darker than surrounding skin, depending on your skin tone.

The symptoms are usually the same in adults and children, but they can be worse in babies and children under 5.

It's possible to get hand, foot and mouth disease more than once.

If you're not sure your child has hand, foot and mouth disease

Look at other childhood rashes.

Information:

Hand, foot and mouth disease has nothing to do with foot and mouth disease that affects farm animals.

How to treat hand, foot and mouth disease yourself

You cannot take antibiotics or medicines to cure hand, foot and mouth disease. It usually gets better on its own in 7 to 10 days.

To help the symptoms:

A pharmacist can help with hand, foot and mouth disease

Speak to a pharmacist for advice about treatments, such as mouth ulcer gels, sprays and mouthwashes, to relieve pain.

They can tell you which ones are suitable for children.

Non-urgent advice: See a GP if:

  • your symptoms or your child's symptoms do not improve after 7 to 10 days
  • you or your child has a very high temperature, or feels hot and shivery
  • you're worried about your child's symptoms
  • your child is dehydrated – they're not peeing as often as usual
  • you're pregnant and get hand, foot and mouth disease

Hand, foot and mouth disease can be spread to other people.

Check with your GP surgery before going. They may suggest a phone consultation.

How to stop hand, foot and mouth disease spreading

Staying off school or nursery

Hand, foot and mouth disease is easily passed on to other people. It's spread in coughs, sneezes, poo and the fluid in the blisters.

You can start spreading it from a few days before you have any symptoms, but you're most likely to spread it to others in the first 5 days after symptoms start.

To reduce the risk of spreading hand, foot and mouth disease:

Keep your child off school or nursery while they're feeling unwell.

But as soon as they're feeling better, they can go back to school or nursery. There's no need to wait until all the blisters have healed.

Keeping your child away from other children for longer is unlikely to stop the illness spreading.

Hand, foot and mouth disease in pregnancy

Although there's usually no risk to the pregnancy or baby, it's best to avoid close contact with anyone who has hand, foot and mouth disease.

This is because:

Speak to a GP or your midwife if you have been in contact with someone with hand, foot and mouth disease.

Page last reviewed: 12 February 2021
Next review due: 12 February 2024